Monday, October 12, 2015

October 12th, 2015 OEDIPUS

STOP MISSING CLASS, my young friends! I LOVE YOUR GUTS, but the more you miss class the harder it is for you to grasp the material! IF YOU NEED HELP, then COMMUNICATE so that I CAN ASSIST YOU!

If you missed class, we completed the following:

1. Each student submitted their homework regarding IRONY in "Inja, the dog!"

2. Students were then introduced to GREEK THEATER and their first aesthetic myth entitled "Oedipus" located on page 268 in your textbook. This is actually one of the most famous pieces of Greek literature that still remains in its entirety. It was first written as a myth, and then converted to a theatrical tragedy by a playwright named Sophocles. Students were given a handout in class covering GREEK THEATER. If you were absent, the handout is available in the "Mythology Make-Up Box."


If you missed class today, please make sure you read the myth of "Oedipus" located on pages. 268-273 in your textbook. You will have a QUIZ over the myth on Wed, October 14th! PLEASE READ THE MYTH! What we do in class on Wednesday is important concerning your schema regarding "Oedipus." This is a valuable piece of literature, as it was originally written as a narrative, and then transformed to a play by Sophocles. It also contains the literary element of IRONY, which adds to the plot line.

This image depicts a theater troupe performing "Oedipus Rex. " Oedipus is in the middle, and the Greek chorus is surrounding him.

We reviewed the three different types of IRONY today in class.
1. Dramatic Irony: This occurs when the audience is aware of specific information that characters are not.
2. Irony of Situation or Situational Irony: This occurs when the outcome of a literary work turns out differently than what the audience originally anticipated.
3. Verbal Irony: This occurs when a characters means the opposite of what they say.



Ancient Greek theater mask. The Greeks used masks to help indicated emotion and the type of drama being performed. This image depicts a TRAGIC mask.


.

I introduced the myth of "Oedipus" to you today (Monday, October 12th) as a catalyst for understanding Greek Drama. I have included some additional images from those I shared with you in class. This myth is extremely significant, as it illustrates the ancient Greeks desire and ability to take their myths and transfer them to the genre of drama.

 WEDNESDAY'S QUIZ:The literary tool of irony is significant to the plot of "Oedipus." As part of your quiz, you will respond to ONE of THREE quotes. I will ask that you explain the irony of the chosen question in relationship to the plot of Oedipus. Your response must be thorough. Responding with, "This section is ironic because Oedipus does not realize Laius is his father," is not detailed enough. You will need to explain ALL the circumstances behind the quote that you "pull from the bag." You may need to go "back in time."  This is why you must READ YOUR MYTH, my fine young friends! You do have access to the questions, as they are below, and you can consider a strong response for each one.

1. "He left his home, Corinth, where he was held to be the son of the king, Polybus, and the reason for his self exile was another Delphic oracle. Apollo had declared that he was fated to kill his father."



2. "...whoever had murdered King Laius must be punished. Oedipus was relieved. Surely the man or men could be found after all these years, and they should know well how to punish him."

3. He spoke to his people..."Let no one of this land give him shelter. Bar him from your homes, as one defiled, companioned by pollution. And solemnly I pray, may he who killed wear out his life in evil, being evil."

   
EXAMPLE from a former student, Sarah Collins, 2014
"No one suffered more than Oedipus. He regarded himself as the father of the whole state; the people in it were his children; the misery of each one was his too."
            "Oedipus,"by Sophocles, represents an incredibly strong piece of literature due to the element of dramatic irony present within the play.  Dramatic irony occurs when the audience has information that characters within the work do not.  The dramatic irony present within the play causes the audience to feel strong emotion, and consequently, pity for Oedipus, the primary character. For example, the following quote, "No one suffered more than Oedipus. He regarded himself as the father of the whole state; the people in it were his children; the misery of each one was his too," acts as a strong dramatic example in that Oedipus has no idea that the reason his subjects are suffering is due to the fact that he has killed his father and married his mother. In essence, as the "father" to the people he loves his "children," but he does not realize that he has "given birth" to their pain.    The audience is aware of his choices and the consequences that have occurred due to a direct result of his fate; yet, Oedipus has no idea that he is entirely responsible for the plague that has fallen upon Thebes.  Oedipus learns  from the Delphic Oracle that the suffering will stop if "whoever murdered King Lauis is puinshed. "  Oedipus receives satisfaction in knowing that the suffering will cease; however, he does not realize that he is the cause. The "father" must "destroy" himself in order to save his "children." The audience recognizes the dramatic irony associated with this section of the play, as it causes them to feel anguish and  dispair for Oedipus who has no idea what he has done.

Monday, October 9th, 2017

Dear Mythology Kids, If you missed class today, we completed the following: 1. PC #11 PC #11 Smithson Funeral Home claims that their c...